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Toyota's mobile initiative reaps dividends

About one year ago, Michael K. Nelson, senior digital marketing manager of digital marketing and social media at Toyota, decided to upgrade the company's mobile marketing campaign, Target Marketing reports.

Toyota had been using QR code technology, but soon decided to move toward SnapTags (rebranded as ToyoTags because of their more "picture-like, eye pleasing" nature, the media outlet explains.

ToyoTags are picture-accessible logos that are placed inside rings, such as car tires. Utilizing the tags for mobile marketing allowed Toyota to expand its "brandability, flexibility and reach," the news source notes.

BrandChannel explains that the tags work by allowing consumers to take images with their mobile phones - you don't need a smartphone for this one - to access additional brand communication, such as discounts, video, product brochures or safety tips.

Toyota is following the lead of other well-known brands such as Coors Light, Coke, Bud Light and the Marines, all of which have all utilized the technology in some way.

Nelson explains to Target Marketing that he recently became aware of his consumers' increased use of mobile technology, and knew that Toyota would be able  to share a lot of information on that channel.

"Mobile marketing, in general, is not really that hard of a task to try to sell here at Toyota," he told the media outlet.  "It's about being there - anytime, anywhere - for this consumer.  And I think that's what ToyoTag does."

Nelson points out that SnapTag technology may soon expand to car shows and dealerships, and notes it can be infused in other capacities - such as on the back of ticket stubs at sporting events - to allow consumers to receive more information about a car special.

Small Cap Network points out that within the first week of Toyota's SnapTag campaign, mobile downloads increased by 600 percent, and then by 700 percent during the second week. It also saw a 25 percent rise in leads.

Another way Toyota is taking advantage of mobile technology is via software called Entune, MobileMarketingWatch reports. It utilizes voice recognition and in-vehicle controls to create a "rich experience that offers fully integrated and upgradeable entertainment, navigation and information services," the news source explains.

Consumers can download the Entune mobile app, and, when paired with a Bluetooth headset, enjoy personalized content and services. 

Content Writer: Matt Rowe Matt Rowe Chief Technical Officer

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